Kathleen Rockwell Lawrence

Selected Works

Novels
“An author with a wicked wit and something of the sensibility of Mary McCarthy. If her novel were nothing but funny, it would have been well worth reading; that it is much more makes it compelling.”
Chicago Tribune
“One is indeed sorry to turn the last page and have to face the fact that Maud Gone is all gone.”
Orlando Sentinel
"Lawrence at her satiric best displays a sure hand in her witty, gritty depiction of life in contemporary Manhattan…lively humor, keen observation, gift for dialogue—wry and witty sensibilities…a comic flair…irreverent..."
Publisher's Weekly
Non-fiction; Essays
"Lawrence writes with—how’s this for an old-fashioned word: humanity. She is compelling, comfortable and convincing about family."
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Works

Maud Gone
Maud flees the maternity ward with her newborn daughter, running away from husband Jack after discovering that the gorgeous Xenia, founder of Painless Birth has borrowed him for the night. This “loving wacky first novel” (Library Journal) suggests that the ultimate pain of childbirth may well be that of shedding the last protective vestiges of one's own childhood.

The Last Room in Manhattan
Losing her sublet and job, Karen Carmody lands Room 742, a dim, slim single in The Corps of Light's Residence for Young Women. Things get worse when a roommate, Martha, arrives. Neither woman is in her first youth, and when they both protest, they are informed by The Corps’ Mrs. Sergeant Major that 742 is an “emergency double.” (The emergency being Manhattan.)

The Boys I Didn’t Kiss: The Collected Essays of Kathleen Rockwell Lawrence
The Boys I Didn’t Kiss is a collection of Lawrence’s essays previously published in The New York Times’ HERS Column and OpEd page; Ms.Glamour; 7Days; Newsday and Poets and Writers Magazine. Boys considers, among other questions:
Why Catholic medical authorities recommend use of a holy condom.
How to establish a salary for your surrogate mother.
The deleterious impact of a communal sock drawer on one’s sexuality.